volumetric video of a (jazz) performance

For my PhD research, I’ve been bouncing ideas around for how to volumetrically capture a performance or classroom session in 3D, and then layer on additional contextual data (interactions between participants, connections, info from dramaturgy, info from SoTL, etc.).

This NEBULA experimental jazz video by Marcin Nowrotek kind of gets at some of what’s in my head. Imagine this, showing a group of students collaborating in an active learning session, and instead of notes/percussion visualizations, some kind of representation of how they are interacting etc… Also, since it’s all in 3D, imagine being able to interact with the recording in 3D using fancy goggles.

Thanks to BoingBoing for the link!

Introducing the new look for D2L at UCalgary

We’re getting ready to roll out the new “Daylight” interface for D2L, which will go live on May 4, 2018. The biggest benefit is a responsive design, which will make the experience on mobile devices much, much better. And, it will also make it more usable through screen readers and other accessibility devices. Also, it’s very shiny.

I’ve given versions of this intro many times in committee meetings, and it’s time to have a quick video version so we can just email people a link. So, after spending a few minutes in our beautiful new audio booth, and a couple of hours messing around with Camtasia

This (or a less cringeworthy version of it) will likely get posted as an embedded video in a News item on our main D2L server sometime before May 4, so all people who use D2L will get to see the new interface before it becomes active.

An ethnographic interview with an AI

via BoingBoing, this video of a presentation by Genevieve Bell from Intel at O’Reilly’s AI Conference, on how to engage the concept of AI from an anthropological and ethnographic framework.

I don’t think of AI as trying to invent an artificial human, but it’s extremely important to think about the cultural, moral, racial, and gender biases that get baked into code through histories of projects.

Patrick Finn on the importance of Loving Thinking

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Patrick sets up the rehearsal for The Extinction Therapist Beakerhead rehearsal session

Patrick Finn is an incredibly inspiring prof, and we’re lucky to have him here at UCalgary.

His work on helping to transition from critical to loving thinking is extremely important. I’ve watched his TEDxYYC talk a few times, and revisited it again after this week’s Beakerhead theatre workshop rehearsal of The Extinction Therapist – an event led by Patrick, with actors presenting their early interpretation of Clem Martini‘s unfinished script. The play was interesting, weird, and thought-provoking – all things we need more of.

Patrick Finn @ TEDxYYC: The Importance of Loving Communication

Also, check out Patrick’s book, “Critical Condition“, with more on his work on loving thinking as an alternative to critical thinking.