Levy (2015). The user as network

Levy, K. E. C. (2015). The user as network. First Monday, 20(11), 3257. http://doi.org/10.1145/2470654.2466446 Notes: p.3258: conceptualizing users as networks: as constellations of power relations and institutional entanglements, mediated through technologies. — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016 p.3258: Most contemporary models of use, then — even as they differentiate among degrees of use and acknowledge the fluidity of use states — still conceptualize the user (or non-user) as a fairly isolated unit with respect to her engagement with the technology in question....

January 31, 2016 · 3 min

Zygmunt Bauman: Social media are a trap

Q. You are skeptical of the way people protest through social media, of so-called "armchair activism," and say that the internet is dumbing us down with cheap entertainment. So would you say that the social networks are the new opium of the people? A. The question of identity has changed from being something you are born with to a task: you have to create your own community. But communities aren't created, and you either have one or you don't....

January 24, 2016 · 2 min

Stewart (2015). Scholarship in abundance: influence, engagement, and attention in scholarly networks

Stewart, B. (2015, April 17). Scholarship in Abundance: Influence, Engagement, and Attention in Scholarly Networks. Retrieved November 2, 2015, from http://bonstewart.com/Scholarship_in_Abundance.pdf Notes: p.19: Overall, the first paper suggests that networks enact and circulate broad intersecting patterns in what counts as influence, and that these depart from the codified terms of rank and bibliometric indexing on which conventional academic influence is judged. At the same time, in spite of meaningful distinctions between participant perceptions of networks and — Highlighted Nov 7, 2015...

November 8, 2015 · 4 min

silos of people

I’ve been experimenting with bits of software to take control of my online content. The functionality is all there for me to run my own stuff, without feeding corporate silos. I can post text, images, photos, videos. I can store files and access them from anywhere. Without having to hand my bits over to any company. Except when I want to play with others. To do that, I still need to wade into the silos....

May 24, 2011 · 3 min

on breaking away from hosted silos

This is a long, rambling, incomplete blog post that's been rattling around in my head for a week. I decided to try to just put something in writing to see if I could make it less unclear. Caveat emptor. If people are to manage their own content, forming their digital identities, they need a way to host software and content that doesn't require obscure and detailed technical knowledge. Us early adopters are not normal....

December 29, 2010 · 9 min

Shared items from my feed reader

One of the things I was missing when I switched from Google Reader to FeverËš was a way to share items from my subscriptions. FeverËš didn't have any way to generate a feed of things I saved, so it was kind of a separate silo. But, the most recent version of FeverËš includes a cool new feature to share my Saved items in an RSS feed. Easy peasy. Here's an embedded view of the last 30 saved items, thanks to the magical wondrousness of Feed2JS: (it'll probably bork in the feed, though....

September 10, 2009 · 1 min

Presentation - Identity in the Open Classroom

I was asked to give a presentation for the From Courses to Dis/Course online conference last week, and chose the topic of identity as it relates to openness. My session, Identity in the Open Classroom, was a fun (for me, anyway) exploration of the issues, and I think served the purpose of framing discussion. Here's the video of the recording from the session: the full chat transcript for the session is available, as well as the full Elluminate session recording....

May 21, 2009 · 1 min

Savage Minds: Notes and Queries in Anthropology — A Group Blog » Facebook and the disambiguation of relationships

Relationships are more than artificial pigeonholes. Rex, at Savage Minds, compares Facebook (and by extension Web 2.0) identities and relationships to those of indigenous vs. colonial cultures. Facebook subsumes face-to-face relationships, in other words, in a way similar to the way that governments subsume indigenous identities. Or at least the identities of Papua New Guinean ‘landowners' that I study. In both cases, an institution identified people as being unambiguously one type or another for the purposes of granting them access to resources and certain types of moral recognition....

February 11, 2009 · 2 min

on context and identity

I had a discussion with King Chung Huang and Paul Pival this morning, about one of King's current research projects. He's working on the topic of context and identity - what it would mean from both institutional and individual perspectives, if our digital identities and contexts were pulled out of the silos of Blackboard, email, and other isolated and closed systems. What would it mean if every person, group, and place has a URL, which is aware of contexts (institutional, academic, geographical, temporal, etc....

October 21, 2008 · 3 min

Open Education Course: week 2 reading

Notes for week 2 of David Wiley's Intro to Open Education course at Utah State University, on Giving Knowledge for Free: The Emergence of Open Educational Resources - Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Centre for Educational Research and Innovation. I think I'm definitely falling down on the academic rigour of my responses - I should be providing a much deeper response, rather than just barfing out some thoughts and questions. I'll try to pick it up for week 3. ...

September 8, 2007 · 6 min