Bill Fitzgerald on education as consumption

[Bill pulls responses to 3 recent articles](http://funnymonkey.com/consumption-and-brand) (and I'd argue a fourth - the [Bill Gates "education is the web" thing](http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CBcQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.gatesfoundation.org%2Fannual-letter%2F2010%2FPages%2Feducation-learning-online.aspx&ei=629lTKvpLYScnwfxr9WuDA&usg=AFQjCNGJ9lROOodaYWEh4-NAvdRt3qYqeA) ) together with a single sentence: > Just to emphasize, whenever anyone talks about "delivering" education, the implication is that learning is a passive activity that can be brought to people - in other words, getting us back into "consuming" mode. Learning is active. There's no getting around that. Therefore, an effective education involves **much** more than simple content distribution....

August 13, 2010 · 1 min

why standards are important

yes, HTML5 is essentially a diluted buzzword for "something shiny on the web that doesn't use flash" - BUT - by using standards, you get to have content used in ways you haven't predicted. For instance, Grant Hutchinson has been playing with a Newton-powered webserver (not linking directly to the server to spare it from the network) for years. Today, he fired up the web browser on one of his Newtons, and pointed it at the Apple HTML5 showcase site....

June 7, 2010 · 1 min

On content as infrastructure

David suggested in his opening comments yesterday that "content is infrastructure." He was (I think) meaning to imply that content is an enabling platform, and that if a robust library of open content is available, that individuals and groups will be able to build new things from that library. Things that can't be predicted by the librarians and publishers. Things that are evolutionary and revolutionary. I completely agree that having freely available and reusable content is an extremely important factor in promoting education and community programs, especially in regions without the resources to build all content from scratch....

September 27, 2007 · 2 min