Anil Dash - The lost infrastructure of social media


A great summary of various bits of tech that made the early blogosphere1 so alive and vibrant in ways that hasn't been captured or reproduced since. How can tools give individuals control over what they create, where they publish, who they follow, what they read, and how they share? These are currently controlled almost exclusively by one of two companies for the majority people on the modern internet. Something amazing, powerful, and enabling was lost in that transition.

More than a decade ago, the earliest era of blogging provided a set of separate but related technologies that helped the nascent form thrive. Today, most have faded away and been forgotten, but new incarnations of these features could still be valuable.As social networks grew in popularity and influence, the old decentralized blogosphere fell apart and those early services consolidated, leaving all the power in the hands of a few private companies. That's left publishers and independent voices even more vulnerable to the control points of a few social networks and search engines.

Source: Anil Dash - The lost infrastructure of social media.” Medium

Much of what I've been trying to do has been fumbling around trying to shift back to many of these bits of tech for my own use. RSS is still king because it lets me control what I read without opaque algorithms shaping and pushing. Blogs are still king because I can publish and archive whatever I want, without worrying or even thinking about where it goes or who gets to modify or transform it.

obi-blogosphere

And, yes, I get that I saw Anil's post on Medium rather than via RSS. Whatever.


  1. man, that's something I haven't said in ages… it used to be a thing. I desperately want for it to be a thing again.


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