Hartshorne & Ajjan (2009). Examining student decisions to adopt web 2.0 technologies


Hartshorne, R., & Ajjan, H. (2009). Examining student decisions to adopt Web 2.0 technologies: theory and empirical tests. Journal of Computing in Higher Education, 21(3), 183–198. http://doi.org/10.1007/s12528-009-9023-6

Notes:

p.185: providing settings and opportunities for both social connectivity and collaborative environments, each considered by many constructivist theorists as important elements of effective teaching and learning environments — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016

p.185: student publication can result in more positive attitudes toward content areas, increased motivation levels, and increased student achievement — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016

p.185: student publication can result in more reflective learning environments, which supports more individual growth and development and can provide opportunities for learners to explore content and problems in new and different ways, providing a more clear and purposeful visualization of one’s work, while also providing opportunities and venues for sharing work and solutions globally — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016

p.187: Student use of Web 2.0 technologies in the classroom—based on theory of planned behavior — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016

p.187: (Ajzen 1991) — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016

p.193: Fig. 2 Path analysis of factors that influence student use of Web 2.0 technologies in the classroom — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016

p.195: behavioral intention was a strong determinant of actual behavior or usage of Web 2.0 — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016

p.195: results also show that perceived usefulness, ease of use, and compatibility of Web 2.0 are key determinants of subject’s attitude to use Web 2.0 technology. In turn, attitude is an important factor in determining student use of Web 2.0 applications — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016

p.195: usability and congruence with existing educational technology tools being implemented in coursework might influence student attitudes toward Web 2.0 applications — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016

p.195: The influence of two groups: superiors and peers (other students) have a positive influence on the students’ subjective norms, with superior influence having a very strong influence on the subjective norm, which, in turn, had a strong influence on behavioral intention. In other words, these two groups are key determinants of the social influence that determines student use of Web 2.0 technologies — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016

p.195: student behavior is likely to be affected by specific course requirements and instructions — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016

p.195: opportunities and environments that promote the use of Web 2.0 to supplement in-class instruction, as well as model uses that are both easy to implement and pedagogically — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016

p.195: Only self efficacy and facilitating resources were found to influence the perception of behavioral control, which also had an influence on behavioral intention of students to use Web 2.0 tools to supplement in-class instruction. On the other hand, facilitating technology does not have an influence on the perception of behavioral control toward the intention and usage of Web 2.0 technologies. These results imply that training and access to resources are important mechanisms to influence Web 2.0 usage, — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016

p.195: facility conditions in terms of technology is not as important — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016

p.195: suggest that most students feel that integrating many Web 2.0 technologies into the classroom learning environment can be effective at increasing satisfaction with the course, improve their learning and their writing ability, and increase student interaction with other students and faculty; thus changing the student role from a passive to an active learner, allowing them to better create and retain knowledge (Maloney — Highlighted Jan 30, 2016


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