on ingress as gamifying network location reporting


Jason tuned me into Ingress at CNIE 2014. There's a good overview of the game on Wired.

It's one of those things that sound unbelievably geeky - it's like geocaching (a geeky repurposing of multibillion dollar GPS satellites to play hide and seek) combined with capture the flag, combined with realtime strategy games, bundled up as a mobile game app (kind of geeky as well), with a backstory of a particle collider inadvertently leading to the discovery of a new form of matter and energy (particle physics? a little geeky). It's the kind of thing where peoples' faces glaze over on the first description of portals and XM points, and resonators and links and fields.

IngressIntelScreenshot

One thing that's been stuck in the back of my head as I worked my way up to Level 5 Nerd of the Resistance in the game, is the lack of an apparent business model. It's a global-scale game, with thousands? millions? of users checking in from all around the world. There don't appear to be ads in the game - I've never seen any - and there appears to be an unwritten rule that portals should be publicly accessible. That unwritten rule largely negates a business model that would have businesses pay for placement in the game in order to draw customers into their stores etc…

Niantic started the game in 2013, and launched it under the "release it free so we build a user base, then sell the company" business plan. It worked, as Google bought the company and ramped the game up. It's now available for both Android and iOS platforms, free of charge, with no advertising or premium subscriptions or in-game purchases.

So, what is Google getting out of it? I think their largest draw is likely in crowdsourced geolocation of networks. They have every Ingress user actively (collectively) wandering the globe, reporting every wireless SSID and cell tower they come across, along with GPS coordinates. The game gently pushes players to stay at the location of a portal, confirming the geolocation and refining precision over time. It's kind of a genius plan - it is constantly updating Google's network geolocation database, which can then be used to more accurately track and target all users of the internet for advertising etc…. They've turned a bunch of nerd's nerds into a crowdsourced network geolocation reporting system. And, at Google's scale, it costs them a pittance to have this system running.

paging the mothership

Ingress' privacy policy link points to Google's common privacy policy and TOS web page, which states:

We may collect device-specific information (such as your hardware model, operating system version, unique device identifiers, and mobile network information including phone number). Google may associate your device identifiers or phone number with your Google Account.

and

When you use a location-enabled Google service, we may collect and process information about your actual location, like GPS signals sent by a mobile device. We may also use various technologies to determine location, such as sensor data from your device that may, for example, provide information on nearby Wi-Fi access points and cell towers.

Common TOS for all Google services, but especially relevant in a geolocation-based game that is actively pushing users to wander their neighbourhoods to gather this data and send it back to Google.

If they'd released the app as a "report network locations to improve google's ad targeting" tool, it would have gotten huge pushback, and not many people would have downloaded it. But, by hiding that function and wrapping an insanely addictive game over top of it, it's gone viral.

brb. I need to go recharge the portal at the playground down the street…


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