All posts by dnorman

UGuelph and D2L sitting in a tree

News of a new collaboration between UGuelph and D2L, on a major pedagogy research initiative:

The pedagogy research project strives to help schools track and report on learning outcomes across programs over time. Researchers will use D2L’s predictive analytics capabilities to document and discover the effectiveness of assessment tools on specific subjects while working with educators to develop a curriculum that results in greater student success.

via University of Guelph to Leverage Desire2Learn’s Integrated Learning Platform for $6 Million Pedagogy Research Initiative | Desire2Learn Press Release.

2 quick thoughts1 on this:

  1. awesome! D2L really does play well with others, and invests in improving teaching and learning rather than just polishing shiny baubles.
  2. surely there is more to this than just predictive analytics. I’d love to see a pedagogical collaboration that was about in-the-trenches teaching (and learning) online, and not just massaging the data gathered about online activities. D2L has been trying to foster an online community of teachers (and others) in their D2L Community site23. It would be really cool to push that community up a few notches and open the doors so anyone can follow along (or join in).

Desire2Learn really feels like they care about teaching and learning – the Fusion conference last year was different from any other vendor conference I’ve been to, and felt decidedly like a good teaching-and-learning conference rather than a buy-our-shiny-products vendor conference.

  1. my own thoughts, not the official position of the university or anything []
  2. which is actually running in the D2L LMS itself []
  3. but it requires a login to see the stuff that goes on inside it []

Bill Nye and presentation zen

Awhile back Bill Nye debated Ken Ham on science vs. creationism, at Ham’s museum of young earth creationism. Nye just posted some background on the talk and his preparations, and this kind of jumped out at me:

On the slides in my “decks,” as they’re called, I do not use many words. My colleagues sent me dozens of PowerPoint slides for my use. Thank you of course, but my goodness you all, when I watch many of your presentations, it’s like reading a page of book projected on a wall. How can someone in the audience focus on what you’re saying, when there’s a blizzard of words in front of her or him?

via Bill Nye’s Take on the Nye-Ham Debate – CSI.

on tony bates retiring

Dr. Bates has been seriously kicking ass for many years. He’s decided to retire – and he deserves it. I can’t even imagine how much energy he’s dedicated to the field of teaching-and-learning, and eLearning, over the last few decades. Well earned retirement.

His post announcing the decision is full of gems. I have to admire his no-BS summary of the state of eLearning.

Even the processes of learning, which used to be relatively stable, given how much is biological, are also undergoing change. Technology is not neutral; it does change the way we think and behave. Furthermore, I foresee major developments in the science of learning that will have major implications for teaching and learning – but it will also have major false directions and mistakes (be very careful with artificial intelligence in particular). So this is a field that needs full-time, professional application, and very hard work, and I just don’t have the energy any more to work at that level. To put it simply, this is not a profession where you can be half in and half out. Dabbling in online learning is very dangerous (politicians please note).

and

And then there’s MOOCs. I can’t express adequately just how pissed off I am about MOOCs – not the concept, but all the hubris and nonsense that’s been talked and written about them. At a personal level, it was as if 45 years of work was for nothing. All the research and study I and many others had done on what makes for successful learning online were totally ignored, with truly disastrous consequences in terms of effective learning for the vast majority of participants who took MOOCs from the Ivy League universities. Having ignored online learning for nearly 20 years, Stanford, MIT and Harvard had to re-invent online learning in their own image to maintain their perceived superiority in all things higher educational. And the media fell for it, hook, line and sinker. This is a battle I no longer want to fight – but it needs fighting. But my reaction did make me wonder, am I just an old man resisting the future? And that has definitely left a mark.

I’d been hoping to find a way to get Tony to visit our campus to work with our Learning Technologies Task Force. Looks like that’s out. But I look forward to following his writing. This is a guy who’s been working in this field for decades, in various roles, and who has had the good fortune to travel and see what various institutions are doing. That’s gold.

Congrats, Tony!