All posts by dnorman

on slowing down

John sent a link to our loose group of cycling buddies, and I’ve read the article 3 times now. Each time, it feels like it hits closer to home.

I’ve been riding my bike as the primary way of getting around, and have been communiting by bike almost exclusively since 2006. I’ve always ridden, but never really considered myself a cyclist until then. I was never athletic, never good at sports. But I was happy on a bike. Over the years, I actually got pretty good on a bike. I could make it go fast. I could climb hills. I could ride far. It was awesome.

And then it started feeling less awesome. Most recently, with my bad knee. Late last year, I somehow managed to get a stress fracture at the top of my tibia. I didn’t even know it had happened, and only wound up at the doctor because I thought I was dealing with progressive arthritis or something. Nope.

We couldn’t find any specific incident that might have caused it, but the doctors thought it may have been related to repetitive stress and strain while riding ~5,000km/year. Which meant it was self-inflicted. I’d been pushing myself for the last few years to try to keep up that pace. And, while limping around like a 70-year-old, I realized that I hadn’t been doing myself any favours. One knee is already pretty much shot, the other is likely not far behind it. And pushing to hit 5,000km/year wasn’t helping things. I’m largely recovered now – the knee is still sore, and feels weaker than it should, but it works. Physio has helped, but it’s obvious I need to pay attention to it before it gets worse.

I’ve been tracking personal metrics since 2006 – with detailed GPS logs since 2010, thanks to my use of Cyclemeter. Recently, I’ve added Strava to the mix. I really notice that I push myself more when I know a ride will be posted to Strava – either I need to let go of that, or I need to stop posting rides1.

I’m not really sure why I was pushing myself to keep hitting 5,000km/year. I think it was the feeling of accomplishment, of achieving a goal that not many people do. Some kind of macho “I’m not getting old! look what I can do!” thing. Whatever. I’m letting that go. I’m still going to ride as much as I can, but I’m not going to push it. I’m going to slow down, again. And have fun.

I’m registered in the Banff Gran Fondo this weekend. 155km, from Banff to Lake Louise and back2. I had been stressing out, because I lost 6 months of riding – of TRAINING! – and there was no way I’d be able to keep up a competitive pace. But that’s OK. I’m going to go for a nice ride. Stop at the rest stops. Enjoy the mountains. And I’ll finish when I finish.


  1. but ride data from Strava is now being used to inform policy and decisions about cycling infrastructure and civic planning, so I think I need to keep posting it for now… []
  2. depending on how well the local bear population cooperates []

defeated

Evan and I made a quick trip to a nearby Enlightened-held portal to try to play a bit of strategy. If we took this one portal back to the Resistance, half of a community would have been freed up from the green menace. The portal was weakened – some level 6 and 8 resonators, but without much energy. We stocked up on XMPs and went for it. We both fired everything we had, but it looks like someone with a key to the portal saw the attack notifications and promptly recharged it all back to 100%. Doh. Wasted effort. Difficult, going up against a Level 11 nerd of the Enlightenment, who owns pretty much everything from the far NW corner of the city right into downtown.


Humans Need Not Apply

C.G.P. Grey posted this fantastic video on the inevitability of automation, and what it might mean for society at large.

We think of technological change as the fancy new expensive stuff, but the real change comes from last decade’s stuff getting cheaper and faster. That’s what’s happening to robots now. And because their mechanical minds are capable of decision making they are out-competing humans for jobs in a way no pure mechanical muscle ever could.

and

You may think even the world’s smartest automation engineer could never make a bot to do your job — and you may be right — but the cutting edge of programming isn’t super-smart programmers writing bots it’s super-smart programmers writing bots that teach themselves how to do things the programmer could never teach them to do.

via a post by Jason Kottke

For an extra-sobering good time, tie this in with Audrey Watters’ writing on robots in education.